Housing bubble-era mortgage loans were especially attractive to subprime borrowers with little demonstrable income or assets, and lenders were only too happy to accommodate them. Hedge funds employ tremendous borrowing, which is needed to achieve the superior returns needed to justify high fees for investors. Private equity funds also use heavy borrowing, typically loading the corporations they take private and clean up with heavy debt and using the proceeds to pay dividends to their investors.

Today, if you're at all serious about succeeding in any endeavor, whether online or offline, you have to deliver enormous amounts of value. Yes, you have to do the most amount of work for the least initial return. This is especially true online. Why? Because it takes time to build authority and create an audience, two primary ingredients necessary to succeed in the wonderful world of commerce on the web.


Be proactive. Remember Murphy's Law: "Whatever can go wrong will go wrong." Make plans, complete with as many calculations as possible, then anticipate everything that can go wrong. Then make contingency or backup plans for each scenario. Don't leave anything to luck. If you're writing a business plan, for example, do your best to estimate when you'll break even, then multiply that time frame by three to get a more realistic date; and after you've identified all the costs, add 20% to that for costs that will come up that you didn't anticipate. Your best defense against Murphy's law is to assume the worst, and brace yourself. An appropriate amount of insurance may be something worth considering. Don't forget the advice of Louis Pasteur, a French chemist who made several incredible breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of disease: "Luck favors the prepared mind."

We all have those moments when we see a business that's so simple or so lucrative -- or both -- that we kick ourselves for not having thought of it first. I prefer to channel those moments into something positive, however, realizing that if "those people" could do it, so can any of us. For inspiration, here are five nearly insane (and often insanely lucrative) businesses that actually worked.
The extent to which companies have dug into and captured children’s social work is not only deep but also wide. It includes companies being funded by central government to shape the future education and accreditation of children’s social workers and managing the short-term money the government is making available for “innovation” in children’s social services, trumpeted as additional funding but minuscule when set alongside the real reduction in government grant.
So if you want to get started, you don't need a website, and you don't need a portfolio of all your work experiences. You could pretty much get started by reaching out to ​businesses and saying, “Hey, I want to do XYZ freelance work for you.” Now, if you're wondering where to get different jobs like these, Upwork, Fiverr, and Craigslist are great places to start.
Whether it’s an important consumer application, a specialist app to solve a particular niche problem, or even a time-wasting game you can play on your phone, you can create a massively successful business if you build software that helps people. (Look at the rise of Slack—the team communication software that went from side project to billion-dollar company in just 2 years.)

The larger the company, the more requirements and prerequisites they likely have in place. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Even though you may need a newer computer, they may be offer health insurance and a full-time schedule. There’s always a trade-off. Know that more scheduling freedom and flexibility and less management oversight may mean lesser pay or no benefits.
As noted in the report, small-cap REITs trade at lower valuations despite higher growth, while large REITs "behave more like bonds, exhibit less growth than small caps." Compass Point defines a large REIT as one where the market cap is greater than $10 billion. Those large REITs traded as much as twice the multiple of funds from operations as the smallest REITs, those under a $500 million market cap.
Now, this isn't about some get-rich-quick method here. If you want to get rich quick, forget about trying to do it on the internet. Sure, Facebook ads are all the craze, but without a serious understanding of the mechanics behind sales funnels and conversion optimizations, which only comes after years and years of in-the-trenches work in the internet marketing field, you're largely wasting your time trying to "get rich quick."
If you are really short on cash and need some immediate funds then you should start by looking around your house. Clear out your cupboards and find any items lying around that you don’t need or haven’t used for a while. Then sell them on eBay. Just because they are gathering dust in your cupboards, doesn’t mean someone else won’t snap them up. Simply sign up with eBay, list your products and then, as they are sold, send them off to the buyers.
Many work-from-home jobs that you find will require you to sit at your computer for long periods each day. So it’s super important that you have a comfortable space to work! Even if it’s just a comfortable chair pulled up to an old table that’s the right height, or a spot on your couch, put some thoughtfulness for your future self into your home office. Your body will thank you. (Oh, and make sure it’s in a quiet spot!)
Travel blogging is a hard industry to break into. However, the rewards can be worth it, and let’s face it, who doesn’t want to be paid for traveling around the world! There are numerous ways to monetize a travel blog, but affiliate marketing should predominantly be your focus. On your blog, promote hotels, tours, equipment hire services, flights, and anything else travel related. Then take a cut of the proceeds as your audience books their holidays based on your recommendations.
So when I'm looking for REITs, I hunt for experienced management teams with a great track record. These executives should have industry contacts that allow them to source deals that may not be available to larger players. These are the reasons I like Jernigan Capital (NYSE:JCAP) in the storage space. It's run by industry veteran Dean Jernigan, who spent seven years at the helm of CubeSmart and then ventured out on his own with this small REIT, now just a $379 million market cap. A few deals for Jernigan can really move the needle, while its publicly traded peers – all of which are substantially larger – must acquire dozens of assets each year to move the needle on growth. It also doesn't hurt that Jernigan pays a 7% yield. I'll have a piece soon that explains more about this tiny REIT. In the meantime, here's a rundown on storage REITs. 

Here’s a good example of how lead sales can work in real life: My second website, Life Insurance by Jeff, brings in a ton of traffic from people who are searching the web to find answers to life insurance questions. While I used to have the website set up so I could sell these people life insurance myself, it was a lot of work to process all the different requests and clients. As a result, I started selling the leads I gathered instead.
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